List Of Questions To Ask An Interviewer

Here is a list of the best questions to ask an interviewer, as being prepared and actually asking questions at the end of a job interview, can hugely impact whether you’ll get the job or not, regardless of how well you did during the job interview.

The best questions to ask an interviewer

The questions you ask in an interview are critical, perhaps even more critical than how you answer the questions you are asked.

Questions to ask an interviewer about the role

It is crucial to ask your potential employer questions about the role, not only to show your interest but also to make sure you make an informed decision, should you receive a job offer. These are the best questions to ask the interviewer about the role.

  • Is this a newly created role or is it replacing someone?
  • Why is there a need for such a role (if new)?
  • Why is the person currently holding this position leaving (if replacing)?
  • Who is this role reporting to?
  • What is the importance of this role in the department/company?
  • What are the key skills for succeeding in this role?
  • What is the typical career path for this role within the company?
  • What are the expectations in the first year from the person holding this position?
  • What are some typical KPI’s for this position?
  • What are some of the challenges for this position?
  • What are some key daily duties for this position?

Questions to ask about the department

While many candidates overlook this, asking questions about the importance of the department will help evaluate how secure the position is and how the structure impacts potential growth. These are the best questions to ask about the department.

  • How is the department structured?
  • What is the importance of the department in the company?
  • Are there any plans for expanding the department in the coming year? Why? Why not?

Questions to ask an interviewer about the company culture

If you are a millennial like me, you will most probably value company culture above most things. Making sure you are not entering a toxic environment and if you are to get the job, you will be valued and will be given the chance to grow, it’s crucial. Here are the best questions to ask an interviewer about company culture.

  • How would you describe the company culture?
  • How flexible is the company in regards to remote work?
  • What are some typical activities for employee engagement?
  • How open is the company to employees’ ideas?
  • How is it like working for the company?
  • How long does a person stay with the company usually?
  • What is the most important aspect of the company culture?

Questions to ask about the company

Don’t neglect to ask questions about the company, as the answers that you will be getting, will provide a great insight into how the role is relevant to what the company is trying to achieve, and how can you help and succeed in the role. Here are the best questions to ask an interviewer about the company.

  • What are the short-term plans and goals of the company?
  • What are some of the company’s biggest achievements so far?
  • What are some of the company’s challenges at the moment?
  • How is the company planning to overcome these challenges?

Questions to ask an interviewer about the interview process

You should always wrap up the interview by asking your potential employer questions about the next steps in the interview process. This way, you know what to expect and when to follow up. Here are the best questions to ask an interviewer about the interview process.

  • When are you expecting to finalize the recruitment process for this role?
  • When are you expecting the person you hire to start?
  • What are the next steps in the interview process?
  • When should I expect to hear from you?

While there are hundreds of other questions that you could ask an interviewer, the above ones are my favorite, as they are genuine and don’t make you, as a candidate, look as if you learned a script by heart. They are fair questions that any candidate should ask at the end of a job interview in order to make sure that he or she has all the information needed before accepting the job.

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